July 17

Why Innovation Matters

Source hubraleigh.com

Source hubraleigh.com

As educators we are faced with a myriad of challenges in the near future. As compared to our predecessors, there is an increased accountability, responsibility and workload in education. Principals have increased observations, walkthroughs and monitoring of student learning objectives. Teachers must ensure that their students are progressing as outlined by their state monitoring. Yet, despite all of this we must innovate. It is not a question of how, but more so why.

 

If you look at these changes in education as another excuse why you will have no time to innovate, then you are falling into the trap. If you are in a position of compliance, then guess what… you are short changing your most precious resources… students!

 

In order to innovate you have to look beyond the present. As an elementary school principal, I try to remind myself of the year the students will graduate high school. For instance, the little kindergartners that will be entering my building in September will part of the class of 2026. Wow, 2026. What will the world be like? That’s why we have to innovate!

source http://blog.lifespantechnology.com/

source http://blog.lifespantechnology.com/

As you plan for the upcoming school year make sure to remind yourself why innovation matters. You have kids, not widgets, that you have to educate. Don’t make excuses for everything you can’t do because of increased accountability, but rather innovate in spite of these changes. Your kids need you and we need you!

 

 


Posted July 17, 2013 by drspikecook in category Innovation

About the Author

Elem Principal, Husband, Father, Twitter Evangelist, Education Blogger, ASCDEdge blogger, Coach, Adjunct Prof, Consultant, Presenter. Co-host of @principalcast

1 thoughts on “Why Innovation Matters

  1. Janet Abercrombie

    I’ve been thinking through the compliance issues and working out a more current appraisal system.

    What I REALLY want to do is help teachers find and develop their passions. If a teacher has a passion for teaching science better, wouldn’t he or she want to innovate? What about those with passions for literacy instruction?

    Passion doesn’t necessarily translate into better teaching. But, if a person’s passion is informed by Marzano’s research, I hypothesise we have a better chance of igniting innovation.

    …but I may still be in the idealist newbie admin stage :)

    Janet | expateducator.com

    Reply

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